This tumblr is dedicated to the lovely Deborah Kerr.

run by frdirector and tracylord

we have moved to FuckYeahDeborahKerr. this blog will remain as an archive.

Dear followers,

due to certain technical issues we have moved to FuckYeahDeborahKerr. this blog is now FuckYeahDeborahKerrArchive and it will remain as an archive only. for the updates, please, follow us HERE. thank you! 

I looove this, and I love Deborah Kerr. Xo ♥

Oh thank you! :)


15 Most Gorgeous Actresses of the 50s
Deborah Kerr

15 Most Gorgeous Actresses of the 50s

  • Deborah Kerr
bellecs:

Deborah Kerr, Black Narcissus

bellecs:

Deborah Kerr, Black Narcissus

tracylord:

Deborah Kerr in “The Innocents”

tracylord:

Deborah Kerr in “The Innocents”

witzseeker:


“The most extraordinary thing about my wife is that in her private life she is extremely shy. I remember that, many summers ago, Garbo came to lunch to our home in Klosters, in Switzerland. The previous fall and winter, Deborah had been playing in Edward Albee’s “Seascape” on Broadway, a play that had won a Pulitzer prize, and remembering that experience, Greta asked her something she had been meaning to ask for quite some time: “How do you do it?” she asked. “How can you get on-stage and perform day after day in front of all those strangers?”. “I am not there”, Deborah replied, “I forget about myself and become the person I am playing”, she said.
Garbo shook her head in amazement. “I couldn’t do that in a million years”. Deborah could have said that she was a professional, but she abstained from making a remark that could have come out as pretentious and critical to the great Swedish actress who, in the late years of her career couldn’t even stand the crew watching her perform and had her sets surrounded by black panels to protect her intimacy.”
from “This is Deborah (Os presento a Deborah)” by Peter Viertel for Nickelodeón, March 1996 (via deborahkerr.es)

*photo by Eric Carpenter

witzseeker:

The most extraordinary thing about my wife is that in her private life she is extremely shy. I remember that, many summers ago, Garbo came to lunch to our home in Klosters, in Switzerland. The previous fall and winter, Deborah had been playing in Edward Albee’s “Seascape” on Broadway, a play that had won a Pulitzer prize, and remembering that experience, Greta asked her something she had been meaning to ask for quite some time: “How do you do it?” she asked. “How can you get on-stage and perform day after day in front of all those strangers?”. “I am not there”, Deborah replied, “I forget about myself and become the person I am playing”, she said.

Garbo shook her head in amazement. “I couldn’t do that in a million years”. Deborah could have said that she was a professional, but she abstained from making a remark that could have come out as pretentious and critical to the great Swedish actress who, in the late years of her career couldn’t even stand the crew watching her perform and had her sets surrounded by black panels to protect her intimacy.

from “This is Deborah (Os presento a Deborah)” by Peter Viertel for Nickelodeón, March 1996 (via deborahkerr.es)

*photo by Eric Carpenter

droppingtheball:

Deborah Kerr in a BBC studio preparing to give her opinions as a member of the review panel discussing the first edition of ‘Woman’s Hour’, 7 October 1946. 
Source: BBC archive

droppingtheball:

Deborah Kerr in a BBC studio preparing to give her opinions as a member of the review panel discussing the first edition of ‘Woman’s Hour’, 7 October 1946. 

Source: BBC archive

witzseeker:



Do you find it very different to play for a film or in the theatre? Cause some actors think it’s the same but others find that being aware of camera angles or having to project the voice makes a lot of difference.
Those are the differences. In the theatre, one has to control the audience. In the cinema, you can get emotion from just closing your eyes or a small gesture. The theatre requires that you project your voice and quiet the audience or make it laugh. There is a stronger feeling of power in the theatre, in a film there are a lot of people involved and in the end the editor will mix it all to the liking of the director. But in the theatre one is up there all alone, there is no one to make the puzzle pieces fit. You have all the power and that is a very strong feeling. I love that. For instance, having a restless audience and having to calm them down.
When I was playing “Tea and Sympathy” one night, there were two drunk men on the first row that didn’t stop talking aloud. I thought they were ruining the scene between the boy and myself. So I took a step closer and yelled “Shut up!” I almost had a heart attack, but I went on with the scene cause in the theatre that is something you can’t absolutely do. One never, ever, talks to the audience. I was horrified but the audience responded quite nicely, they applauded.
from “Conversations with Deborah” by Jose Luís Garci – Nickelodeón. June 6th, 1995 (via deborahkerr.es)


i would’ve loved to see Deborah yelling “shut up!” at those drunk idiots. where’s the time machine when you need it?!

witzseeker:

Do you find it very different to play for a film or in the theatre? Cause some actors think it’s the same but others find that being aware of camera angles or having to project the voice makes a lot of difference.

Those are the differences. In the theatre, one has to control the audience. In the cinema, you can get emotion from just closing your eyes or a small gesture. The theatre requires that you project your voice and quiet the audience or make it laugh. There is a stronger feeling of power in the theatre, in a film there are a lot of people involved and in the end the editor will mix it all to the liking of the director. But in the theatre one is up there all alone, there is no one to make the puzzle pieces fit. You have all the power and that is a very strong feeling. I love that. For instance, having a restless audience and having to calm them down.

When I was playing “Tea and Sympathy” one night, there were two drunk men on the first row that didn’t stop talking aloud. I thought they were ruining the scene between the boy and myself. So I took a step closer and yelled “Shut up!” I almost had a heart attack, but I went on with the scene cause in the theatre that is something you can’t absolutely do. One never, ever, talks to the audience. I was horrified but the audience responded quite nicely, they applauded.

from “Conversations with Deborah” by Jose Luís Garci – Nickelodeón. June 6th, 1995 (via deborahkerr.es)

i would’ve loved to see Deborah yelling “shut up!” at those drunk idiots. where’s the time machine when you need it?!

witzseeker:

Deborah Kerr as Bridie Quilty in I See A Dark Stranger (1946), the role that won her (together with the role in Black Narcissus) a New York Film Critics Circle Award as Best Actress in 1947.

Bridie Quilty: I’m 21; I’m me own mistress. Woman: That’s an occupation that could change hands overnight. 

witzseeker:

Deborah Kerr as Bridie Quilty in I See A Dark Stranger (1946), the role that won her (together with the role in Black Narcissus) a New York Film Critics Circle Award as Best Actress in 1947.

Bridie Quilty: I’m 21; I’m me own mistress. 
Woman: That’s an occupation that could change hands overnight. 

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